office and desk LED lighting

Believe the hype: LED lighting can help you save money. When looked at holistically, factoring in the cost of electricity over the lifetime of the bulb, a house full of LED lights could actually save you hundreds of dollars. 

Let's do the math.

LED Is for the Long Term

According to GreenBiz.com: "A conventional 60-watt bulb lasts about 1,000 hours, uses 60 watts of electricity and costs $180 to run for 25,000 hours. The LED equivalent lasts 25,000 hours (nearly three years if you left it on 24/7), uses 12.5 watts and costs $37.50 to run for 25,000 hours."  I've outlined the math below.

energy savings incandescent vs LED

The calculations above are based on the Philips Ambient 12 Watt LED Medium Base Light Bulb, a light bulb that fits into any medium base fixture, intended to replace incandescent bulb usage. However, there are also tons of designs available with the LEDs built right into the design.

Save money by using LED lights in every room of the house:  

The Entryway>

The Dining Room>

The Bathroom>

The Office or Work Space>

Discover a Warmer, Gentler LED

You most likely have heard an incandescent bulb described as a "warm" light. This look or feel of the light is its color temperature. Lower color temperatures (in the range of 2700K to 3000K) appear yellow/white and, despite their lower color temperatures, are referred to as "warm" in color; higher color temperatures (5000K and higher) appear blue/white and, despite their higher color temperatures, are referred to as "cool."

LED lighting has typically been associated with these harsher looking higher color temperatures. But that is changing. Increasingly, LEDs are reaching down into the warm 3000K range, resulting in color akin to incandescent bulbs and much more natural light than most fluorescent lights.

LED on color temperature scale

The environmental impact of LED lighting is difficult to compare directly against other options, but the circumstantial data is encouraging.

  • Requiring 1/5 to 1/10 the energy of an incandescent bulb, LEDs clearly reduce strain on power plants.
  • With a life span of decades, not months, LEDs reduce strain on landfills.  
  • Unlike the compact fluorescent light (CFL), the LED doesn't contain toxic mercury.  

Natural looking. Cost effective. Environmentally friendly. LEDs are a slam dunk, right? Assuming you find a style you like, the answer is probably yes. In an interview blogger Cori Magee conducted last year with Edmund Ng and Kenneth Ng of Koncept Lighting, they discussed the role of aesthetics in designing for LEDs. "Both form and function are equally important," explained the Ng brothers. "New materials enable new designs. If we find a good material, we are able to create an exciting design around it."

It's this type of commitment to design, technology and, ultimately, cost that leads us to believe the future looks bright for LEDs.   

Images: Koncept, Kozai Modern, Toni Spilsbury